Seizure Disorders in Cats

This information comes to us courtesy of PetPlace.com.

sleeping kitten

This guy is just sleeping!

A seizure or convulsion is a sudden excessive firing of nerves in the brain. It results in a series of involuntary contractions of the voluntary muscles, abnormal sensations, abnormal behaviors, or some combination of these events. A seizure can last from seconds to minutes.

The severity of the seizure can vary between a far-away look or twitching in one part of the face to your cat falling on his side, barking, gnashing his teeth, urinating, defecating and paddling his limbs.

Seizures are symptoms of some neurological disorder – they are not in themselves a disease. Some underlying causes include:

  • Low blood glucose (sugar)
  • Liver disease (called “hepatic encephalopathy”)
  • Inflammatory or infectious diseases that affect the nervous system
  • Poisons or toxins
  • Brain tumor
  • Head trauma
  • Blood vessel disorders that affect circulation to the brain
  • Congenital problems – those present at birth – such as hydrocephalus (“water on the brain”).

Seizures frequently are idiopathic, which means the cause cannot be determined. A diagnosis of seizure disorder does not mean nothing can be done for your pet.

There is no current accurate estimate of the incidence of seizure episodes in cats. Seizures occur in both males and females with equal frequency, and many pets have one seizure and never have another.

For more information and the rest of the article, including Components of a seizure, Warning signs of a seizure, and What to do if you pet has a seizure, see the PetPlace.com article,  Seizure Disorders in Cats.